SIMBAD references

1999ApJ...526..445A - Astrophys. J., 526, 445-450 (1999/November-3)

The rise and fall of µ Velorum: a remarkable flare on a yellow giant star observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer.

AYRES T.R., OSTEN R.A. and BROWN A.

Abstract (from CDS):

The close visual double µ Velorum (HD 93497; G6 III+dF) consists of a yellow giant and a fainter companion currently 2" apart. Recently µ Vel was the source of a large flare recorded by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer. The long 1.5 day decay phase was like the extremes seen on hyperactive RS CVn-type binaries. The primary, µ Vel A is a 3 M star, in the ``rapid braking zone'' redward of G0 III. Yellow giants are not commonly reported as flare stars, perhaps because the first-crossers are relatively rare and not well represented in the observational samples. The secondary star is classified G2 V, but the 1700 Å energy distribution places it earlier on the main sequence, probably F4 or F5 V, in a class also not usually known for coronal variability. The long duration of the µ Vel event suggests that it occurred in a significantly elongated structure of moderate density, ne≲109 cm–3. If it was a magnetic plasmoid, like a coronal mass ejection on the Sun, then such events might play a role in shedding angular momentum from active evolved stars. The associated spin-down could control the activity survival time of red giants (in later stages of evolution than the first-crosser µ Vel) whose dynamos were rejunvenated by dredge-up of angular momentum from the interior, or more exotic sources, such as cannibalism of close-in substellar companions during the first or second ascent.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): Stars: Activity - Stars: Coronae - Stars: Flare - stars: individual (HD 93497, HD 4128) - Stars: Late-Type - Ultraviolet: Stars

Simbad objects: 8

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2019.12.11-23:50:50

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