SIMBAD references

2000A&A...361..863G - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 361, 863-876 (2000/9-3)

1.65 µm (H-band) surface photometry of galaxies. V. Profile decomposition of 1157 galaxies.

GAVAZZI G., FRANZETTI P., SCODEGGIO M., BOSELLI A. and PIERINI D.

Abstract (from CDS):

We present near-infrared H-band (1.65µm) surface brightness profile decomposition for 1157 galaxies in five nearby clusters of galaxies: Coma, A1367, Virgo, A262 and Cancer, and in the bridge between Coma and A1367 in the ``Great Wall". The optically selected (mpg≤16.0) sample is representative of all Hubble types, from E to Irr+BCD, except dE and of significantly different environments, spanning from isolated regions to rich clusters of galaxies. We model the surface brightness profiles with a de Vaucouleurs r1/4 law (dV), with an exponential disk law (E), or with a combination of the two (B+D). From the fitted quantities we derive the H band effective surface brightness (µe) and radius (re) of each component, the asymptotic magnitude HT and the light concentration index C31. We find that: i) Less than 50% of the Elliptical galaxies have pure dV profiles. The majority of E to Sb galaxies is best represented by a B+D profile. All Scd to BCD galaxies have pure exponential profiles. ii) The type of decomposition is a strong function of the total H band luminosity (mass), independent of the Hubble classification: the fraction of pure exponential decompositions decreases with increasing luminosity, that of B+D increases with luminosity. Pure dV profiles are absent in the low luminosity range LH<1010L and become dominant above 1011L

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): galaxies: fundamental parameters - galaxies: photometry - infrared: galaxies

VizieR on-line data: <Available at CDS (J/A+A/361/863): * table2.dat>

Status at CDS:  

Simbad objects: 1118

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2020.03.31-16:13:14

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