SIMBAD references

2000ApJ...543L..61H - Astrophys. J., 543, L61-L65 (2000/November-1)

Electron heating and cosmic rays at a supernova shock from Chandra X-ray observations of 1E 0102.2-7219.

HUGHES J.P., RAKOWSKI C.E. and DECOURCHELLE A.

Abstract (from CDS):

In this Letter, we use the unprecedented spatial resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory to carry out, for the first time, a measurement of the postshock electron temperature and proper motion of a young supernova remnant, specifically to address questions about the postshock partition of energy among electrons, ions, and cosmic rays. The expansion rate, 0.100%±0.025% yr–1, and inferred age, ∼1000 yr, of 1E 0102.2-7219, from a comparison of X-ray observations spanning 20 yr, are fully consistent with previous estimates based on studies of high-velocity oxygen-rich optical filaments in the remnant. With a radius of 6.4 pc for the blast wave estimated from the Chandra image, our expansion rate implies a blast-wave velocity of ∼6000 km.s–1 and a range of electron temperatures 2.5-45 keV, dependent on the degree of collisionless electron heating. Analysis of the Chandra CCD spectrum of the immediate postshock region reveals a thermal plasma with abundances and column density typical of the Small Magellanic Cloud and an electron temperature of 0.4-1 keV. The measured electron temperature is significantly lower than the plausible range above, which can be reconciled only if we assume that a significant fraction of the shock energy, rather than contributing to the heating of the postshock electrons and ions, has gone into generating cosmic rays.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): ISM: Cosmic Rays - ISM: Individual: Alphanumeric: 1E 0102.2-7219 - Shock Waves - ISM: Supernova Remnants - X-Rays: ISM

Simbad objects: 3

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2019.11.20-01:28:01

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