SIMBAD references

2001AJ....121..391D - Astron. J., 121, 391-398 (2001/January-0)

WSRT and VLA observations of the 6 centimeter and 2 centimeter lines of H2CO in the direction of W58C1 (ON 3) and W58C2.

DICKEL H.R., GOSS W.M. and DE PREE C.G.

Abstract (from CDS):

Absorption in the J(K,K+)=211-212 transition of formaldehyde at 2 cm toward the ultracompact H II regions C1 and C2 of W58 has been observed with the Very Large Array with an angular resolution of ∼0".2 and a velocity resolution of ∼1 km.s–1. The high-resolution continuum image of C1 (also known as ON) shows a partial shell that opens to the northeast. Strong H2CO absorption is observed against W58C1. The highest optical depth (τ>2) occurs in the southwest portion of C1 near the edge of the shell, close to the continuum peak. The absorption is weaker toward the nearby, more diffuse compact H II region C2, τ≤0.3. The H2CO velocity (-21.2 km.s–1) toward C1 is constant and agrees with the velocity of CO emission, main-line OH masers, and the H76α recombination line, but differs from the velocity of the 1720 MHz OH maser emission (~-13 km.s–1). Observations of the absorption in the J(K,K+)=110-111 transition of formaldehyde at 6 cm toward W58C1 and C2 carried out earlier with the Westerbork Aperture Synthesis Telescope at lower resolution (∼4''x7'') show comparable optical depths and velocities to those observed at 2 cm. Based on the mean optical depth profiles at 6 and 2 cm, the volume density of molecular hydrogen n(H2) and the formaldehyde column density N(H2CO) were determined. The n(H2) is ∼6x104 cm–3 toward C1. N(H2CO) for C1 is ∼8x1014 cm–2, while that toward C2 is ∼8x1013 cm–2.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): ISM: individual (W58C) - ISM: individual (ON 3, K3-50) - ISM: Molecules

Nomenclature: Fig.1a: [W69] AN (No. C5) added.

Simbad objects: 12

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