SIMBAD references

2006A&A...445..633E - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 445, 633-645 (2006/1-2)

Oxygen abundances in planet-harbouring stars. Comparison of different abundance indicators.

ECUVILLON A., ISRAELIAN G., SANTOS N.C., SHCHUKINA N.G., MAYOR M. and REBOLO R.

Abstract (from CDS):

We present a detailed and uniform study of oxygen abundances in 155 solar type stars, 96 of which are planet hosts and 59 of which form part of a volume-limited comparison sample with no known planets. EW measurements were carried out for the [OI] 6300Å line and the OI triplet, and spectral synthesis was performed for several OH lines. NLTE corrections were calculated and applied to the LTE abundance results derived from the OI 7771-5Å triplet. Abundances from [OI], the OI triplet and near-UV OH were obtained in 103, 87 and 77 dwarfs, respectively. We present the first detailed and uniform comparison of these three oxygen indicators in a large sample of solar-type stars. There is good agreement between the [O/H] ratios from forbidden and OH lines, while the NLTE triplet shows a systematically lower abundance. We found that discrepancies between OH, [OI] and the OI triplet do not exceed 0.2dex in most cases. We have studied abundance trends in planet host and comparison sample stars, and no obvious anomalies related to the presence of planets have been detected. All three indicators show that, on average, [O/Fe] decreases with [Fe/H] in the metallicity range -0.8<[Fe/H]<0.5. The planet host stars present an average oxygen overabundance of 0.1-0.2dex with respect to the comparison sample.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): stars: abundances - stars: chemically peculiar - stars: evolution - stars: planetary systems - Galaxy: solar neighbourhood

Simbad objects: 154

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2019.09.19-21:44:30

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