SIMBAD references

2007PASJ...59S.257M - Publ. Astron. Soc. Jap., 59, 257-267 (2007/January-0)

Suzaku observation of two ultraluminous X-ray sources in NGC 1313.

MIZUNO T., MIYAWAKI R., EBISAWA K., KUBOTA A., MIYAMOTO M., WINTER L.M., UEDA Y., ISOBE N., DEWANGAN G.C., DONE C., GRIFFITHS R.E., HABA Y., KOKUBUN M., KOTOKU J., MAKISHIMA K., MATSUSHITA K., MUSHOTZKY R.F., NAMIKI M., PETRE R., TAKAHASHI H., TAMAGAWA T. and TERASHIMA Y.

Abstract (from CDS):

Two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in the nearby Sb galaxy NGC 1313, named X-1 and X-2, were observed with Suzaku on 2005 September 15. During the observation for a net exposure of 28 ks (but over a gross time span of 90ks), both objects varied in intensity by about 50%. The 0.4-10keV X-ray luminosities of X-1 and X-2 were measured as 2.5 x 1040 erg/s and 5.8 x 1039 erg/s, respectively, with the former exhibiting the highest ever reported for this ULX. The spectrum of X-1 can be explained by the sum of a strong and variable power-law component with a high-energy cutoff, and a stable multicolor blackbody with an innermost disk temperature of ∼ 0.2 keV. These results suggest that X-1 was in a ``very high'' state, where disk emission is strongly Comptonized. The absorber within NGC 1313 toward X-1 is suggested to have a subsolar oxygen abundance. The spectrum of X-2 is best represented, in its fainter phase, by a multicolor blackbody model with an innermost disk temperature of 1.2-1.3keV, and becomes flatter as the source becomes brighter. Hence, X-2 is interpreted to be in a slim-disk state. These results suggest that the two ULXs have black hole masses of some dozens to a few hundred of solar masses.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): accretion, accretion disks - black hole physics - X-rays: individual (NGC 1313 X-1, NGC 1313 X-2)

Simbad objects: 12

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