SIMBAD references

2008MNRAS.386.1347P - Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 386, 1347-1354 (2008/May-3)

Jupiter and Super-Earth embedded in a gaseous disc.

PODLEWSKA E. and SZUSZKIEWICZ E.

Abstract (from CDS):

In this paper we investigate the evolution of a pair of interacting planets - a Jupiter-mass planet and a Super-Earth with a mass of 5.5 M- orbiting a Solar-type star and embedded in a gaseous protoplanetary disc. We focus on the effects of type I and II orbital migrations, caused by the planet-disc interaction, leading to the capture of the Super-Earth in first-order mean-motion resonances by the Jupiter. The stability of the resulting resonant system in which the Super-Earth is on the internal orbit relative to the Jupiter is studied numerically by means of full 2D hydrodynamical simulations. Our main aim is to determine the Super-Earth behaviour in the presence of the gas giant in the system. It is found that the Jupiter captures the Super-Earth into the interior 3:2 or 4:3 mean-motion resonance, and that the stability of such configurations depends on the initial positions of the planets and on the evolution of the eccentricity. If the initial separation of the orbits of the planets is larger than or close to that required for the exact resonance, the final outcome is the migration of the pair of planets at a rate similar to that of the gas giant, at least for the time of our simulations. Otherwise, we observe a scattering of the Super-Earth from the disc. The evolution of planets immersed in a gaseous disc is compared with their behaviour in the case of the classical three-body problem when the disc is absent.

Abstract Copyright: © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 RAS

Journal keyword(s): methods: numerical - planets and satellites: formation

Simbad objects: 7

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2019.10.17-03:35:33

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