SIMBAD references

2009A&A...497..563N - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 497, 563-581 (2009/4-2)

Chemical abundances of 451 stars from the HARPS GTO planet search program. Thin disc, thick disc, and planets.

NEVES V., SANTOS N.C., SOUSA S.G., CORREIA A.C.M. and ISRAELIAN G.

Abstract (from CDS):

We present a uniform study of the chemical abundances of 12 elements (Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Na, Mg, and Al) derived from the spectra of 451 stars observed as part of one of the HARPS GTO planet search programs. Sixty eight of these are planet-bearing stars. The main goals of our work are: i) the investigation of possible differences between the abundances of stars with and without planets; ii) the study of the possible differences in the abundances of stars in the thin and the thick disc. We confirm that there is a systematically higher metallicity in planet host stars, when compared to non planet-hosts, common to all studied species. We also found that there is no difference in the galactic chemical evolution trends of the stars with and without planets. Stars that harbour planetary companions simply appear to be in the high metallicity tail of the distribution. We also confirm that Neptunian and super-Earth class planets may be easier to find at lower metallicities. A statistically significative abundance difference between stars of the thin and the thick disc was found for [Fe/H]<0. However, the populations from the thick and the thin disc cannot be clearly separated.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): stars: abundances - Galaxy: abundances - stars: fundamental parameters - stars: planetary systems - Galaxy: disk - Galaxy: solar neighbourhood

VizieR on-line data: <Available at CDS (J/A+A/497/563): table1.dat table3.dat>

Simbad objects: 44

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2019.12.11-10:22:10

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