SIMBAD references

2011ApJ...740L..21W - Astrophys. J., 740, L21 (2011/October-2)

A uniform correlation between synchrotron luminosity and Doppler factor in gamma-ray bursts and blazars: a hint of similar intrinsic luminosities?

WU Q., ZOU Y.-C., CAO X., WANG D.-X. and CHEN L.

Abstract (from CDS):

We compile 23 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and 21 blazars with estimated Doppler factors, and the Doppler factors of GRBs are estimated from their Lorentz factors by assuming their jet viewing angles θ ⟶ 0°. Using the conventional assumption that the prompt emission of GRBs is dominated by the synchrotron radiation, we calculate the synchrotron luminosity of GRBs from their total isotropic energy and burst duration. Intriguingly, we discover a uniform correlation between the synchrotron luminosity and Doppler factor,, for GRBs and blazars, which suggests that they may share some similar jet physics. One possible reason is that GRBs and blazars have, more or less, similar intrinsic synchrotron luminosities and both of them are strongly enhanced by the beaming effect. After Doppler and redshift correction, we find that the intrinsic peak energy of the GRBs ranges from 0.1 to 3 keV with a typical value of 1 keV. We further correct the beaming effect for the observed luminosity of GRBs and find that a positive correlation exists between the intrinsic synchrotron luminosity and peak energy for GRBs, which is similar to that of blazars. Our results suggest that both the intrinsic positive correlation and the beaming effect may be responsible for the observed tight correlation between the isotropic energy and the peak energy in GRBs (the so-called Amati relation).

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): BL Lacertae objects: general - galaxies: jets - gamma-rays bursts: general - methods: statistical

Simbad objects: 44

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2019.10.20-03:53:48

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