SIMBAD references

2012AJ....144...96I - Astron. J., 144, 96 (2012/October-0)

The shapes of the H I velocity profiles of the THINGS galaxies.

IANJAMASIMANANA R., DE BLOK W.J.G., WALTER F. and HEALD G.H.

Abstract (from CDS):

We analyze the shapes of the H I velocity profiles of The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey to study the phase structure of the neutral interstellar medium and its relation to global galaxy properties. We use a method analogous to the stacking method sometimes used in high-redshift H I observations to construct high-signal-to-noise (S/N) profiles. We call these high-S/N profiles super profiles. We analyze and discuss possible systematics that may change the observed shapes of the super profiles. After quantifying these effects and selecting a subsample of unaffected galaxies, we find that the super profiles are best described by a narrow and a broad Gaussian component, which are evidence of the presence of the cold neutral medium and the warm neutral medium. The velocity dispersion of the narrow component ranges from ∼3.4 to ∼8.6 km/s with an average of 6.5±1.5 km/s, whereas that of the broad component ranges from ∼10.1 to ∼24.3 km/s with an average of 16.8 ±4.3 km/s. We find that the super profile parameters correlate with star formation indicators such as metallicity, far-UV-near-UV colors, and Hα luminosities. The flux ratio between the narrow and broad components tends to be highest for high-metallicity, high-star-formation-rate galaxies. We show that the narrow component identified in the super profiles is associated with the presence of star formation, and possibly with molecular hydrogen.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): galaxies: dwarf - galaxies: fundamental parameters - galaxies: ISM - galaxies: spiral - ISM: kinematics and dynamics - radio lines: ISM

Simbad objects: 38

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2019.10.15-07:18:23

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