SIMBAD references

2014MNRAS.438.3058R - Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 438, 3058-3069 (2014/March-2)

Connecting radio variability to the characteristics of gamma-ray blazars.

RICHARDS J.L., HOVATTA T., MAX-MOERBECK W., PAVLIDOU V., PEARSON T.J. and READHEAD A.C.S.

Abstract (from CDS):

We present results from four years of twice-weekly 15GHz radio monitoring of about 1500 blazars with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40 m telescope. Using the intrinsic modulation index to measure variability amplitude, we find that, with >6σ significance, the radio variability of radio-selected gamma-ray-loud blazars is stronger than that of gamma-ray-quiet blazars. Our extended data set also includes at least 21 months of data for all AGN with `clean' associations in the Fermi Large Area Telescope First AGN Catalog, 1LAC. With these additional data, we examine the radio variability properties of a gamma-ray-selected blazar sample. Within this sample, we find no evidence for a connection between radio variability amplitude and optical classification. In contrast, for our radio-selected sample we find that the BL Lac object subpopulation is more variable than the flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) subpopulation. Radio variability is found to correlate with the synchrotron peak frequency, with low- and intermediate-synchrotron-peaked blazars varying more than high-synchrotron-peaked ones. We find evidence for a significant negative correlation between redshift and radio variability among bright FSRQs.

Abstract Copyright: © 2014 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society (2014)

Journal keyword(s): galaxies: active - BL Lacertae objects: general - quasars: general - radio continuum: galaxies

VizieR on-line data: <Available at CDS (J/MNRAS/438/3058): table1.dat table2.dat>

Simbad objects: 1414

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2019.09.16-05:02:25

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