SIMBAD references

2016ApJ...828...15H - Astrophys. J., 828, 15-15 (2016/September-1)

Carbon stars in the satellites and halo of M31.

HAMREN K., BEATON R.L., GUHATHAKURTA P., GILBERT K.M., TOLLERUD E.J., BOYER M.L., ROCKOSI C.M., SMITH G.H., MAJEWSKI S.R. and HOWLEY K.

Abstract (from CDS):

We spectroscopically identify a sample of carbon stars in the satellites and halo of M31 using moderate-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo survey. We present the photometric properties of our sample of 41 stars, including their brightness with respect to the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) and their distributions in various color-color spaces. This analysis reveals a bluer population of carbon stars fainter than the TRGB and a redder population of carbon stars brighter than the TRGB. We then apply principal component analysis to determine the sample's eigenspectra and eigencoefficients. Correlating the eigencoefficients with various observable properties reveals the spectral features that trace effective temperature and metallicity. Putting the spectroscopic and photometric information together, we find the carbon stars in the satellites and halo of M31 to be minimally impacted by dust and internal dynamics. We also find that while there is evidence to suggest that the sub-TRGB stars are extrinsic in origin, it is also possible that they are are particularly faint members of the asymptotic giant branch.

Abstract Copyright: © 2016. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

Journal keyword(s): galaxies: individual: M31 - stars: AGB and post-AGB - stars: carbon - stars: carbon

Nomenclature: Table 2: [HBG2016] NNNNNNNN N=40 (Nos 131-60001744), Table 2: [HBG2016] osN N=1 (No os2).

Simbad objects: 74

goto Full paper

goto View the reference in ADS

To bookmark this query, right click on this link: simbad:2016ApJ...828...15H and select 'bookmark this link' or equivalent in the popup menu


2019.10.22-14:45:33

© Université de Strasbourg/CNRS

    • Contact