SIMBAD references

2017MNRAS.471L.131D - Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 471, L131-L134 (2017/October-2)

The geometry of a radio pulsar beam.

DYKS J.

Abstract (from CDS):

Taxonomy of radio pulsar profiles is mostly based on a system of Ptolemaic artificiality, consisting of separated rings and a core, arbitrarily located at disparate altitudes in the magnetosphere. Diversity of observed profile shapes clearly exceeds the interpretive capability of such conal model. Moreover, bifurcated features observed in pulsar profiles imply a system of fan beams radially extending away from the dipole axis. The bifurcations can be understood as the imprint of the elementary radiation pattern of the long-sought radio emission mechanism, thus identifying the latter. Their size, however, is several times larger than implied by the curvature of magnetic dipole lines. Here, I show that the illusion of disconnected rings and the size of bifurcated features can be explained through a natural geometry that combines the properties of both the cone and the fan beam. It is a flaring spiral that makes several revolutions around the dipole axis on its way to leave the magnetosphere. Such geometry is consistent with a stream of outflowing and laterally drifting plasma. The bifurcated components are so wide because the curvature on such a spiral is larger than that of the dipolar magnetic field, and hence they are consistent with the extraordinary mode curvature radiation.

Abstract Copyright: © 2017 The Author Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society

Journal keyword(s): radiation mechanisms: non-thermal - pulsars: general - pulsars: individual: PSR B1541+09 - pulsars: individual: PSR B1821+05 - pulsars: individual: PSR B1946+35 - pulsars: individual: PSR J1012+5307

Simbad objects: 12

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2021.02.26-17:06:28

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