SIMBAD references

2018ApJ...859..128A - Astrophys. J., 859, 128-128 (2018/June-1)

Exploring the variability of the flat-spectrum radio source 1633+382. II. Physical properties.

ALGABA J.-C., LEE S.-S., RANI B., KIM D.-W., KINO M., HODGSON J., ZHAO G.-Y., BYUN D.-Y., GURWELL M., KANG S.-C., KIM J.-Y., KIM J.-S., KIM S.-W., PARK J.-H., TRIPPE S. and WAJIMA K.

Abstract (from CDS):

The flat-spectrum radio quasar 1633+382 (4C 38.41) showed a significant increase of its radio flux density during the period 2012 March-2015 August, which correlates with γ-ray flaring activity. Multi-frequency simultaneous very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations were conducted as part of the interferometric monitoring of gamma-ray bright active galactic nuclei (iMOGABA) program and supplemented with additional radio monitoring observations with the OVRO 40 m telescope, the Boston University VLBI program, and the Submillimeter Array. The epochs of the maxima for the two largest γ-ray flares coincide with the ejection of two respective new VLBI components. Analysis of the spectral energy distribution indicates a higher turnover frequency after the flaring events. The evolution of the flare in the turnover frequency-turnover flux density plane probes the adiabatic losses in agreement with the shock-in-jet model. The derived synchrotron self-absorption magnetic fields, of the order of 0.1 mG, do not seem to change dramatically during the flares, and are much weaker, by a factor 104, than the estimated equipartition magnetic fields, indicating that the source of the flare may be associated with a particle-dominated emitting region.

Abstract Copyright: © 2018. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

Journal keyword(s): galaxies: active - galaxies: jets - quasars: individual: 4C 38.41

Simbad objects: 13

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2019.10.16-18:03:27

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