SIMBAD references

2018ApJ...863..137O - Astrophys. J., 863, 137-137 (2018/August-3)

X-ray luminosity and size relationship of supernova remnants in the LMC.

OU P.-S., CHU Y.-H., MAGGI P., LI C.-J., CHANG U.P. and GRUENDL R.A.

Abstract (from CDS):

The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) has ∼60 confirmed supernova remnants (SNRs). Because of the known distance, 50 kpc, the SNRs' angular sizes can be converted to linear sizes, and their X-ray observations can be used to assess X-ray luminosities (LX). We have critically examined the LMC SNRs' sizes reported in the literature to determine the most plausible sizes. These sizes and the LX determined from XMM-Newton observations are used to investigate their relationship to explore the environmental and evolutionary effects on the X-ray properties of SNRs. Our research provides the following three results. (1) Small LMC SNRs, a few to 10 pc in size, are all Type Ia with LX > 1036 erg s–1. The scarcity of small core-collapse (CC) SNRs is a result of CC SNe exploding in the low-density interiors of interstellar bubbles blown by their massive progenitors during their main-sequence phase. (2) Medium-sized (10-30 pc) CC SNRs show bifurcation in LX, with the X-ray-bright SNRs either in an environment associated with molecular clouds or containing pulsars and pulsar-wind nebulae and the X-ray-faint SNRs being located in low-density interstellar environments. (3) Large (size > 30 pc) SNRs show a trend of LX fading with size, although the scatter is large. The observed relationship between LX and sizes can help constrain models of SNR evolution.

Abstract Copyright: © 2018. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

Journal keyword(s): ISM: supernova remnants - Magellanic Clouds - supernovae: general - X-rays: ISM

Simbad objects: 74

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2019.09.18-10:07:24

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