SIMBAD references

2019MNRAS.486.2850D - Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 486, 2850-2872 (2019/June-3)

SN 2016B a.k.a. ASASSN-16ab: a transitional Type II supernova.

DASTIDAR R., MISRA K., SINGH M., SAHU D.K., PASTORELLO A., GANGOPADHYAY A., TOMASELLA L., BENETTI S., TERRERAN G., SANWAL P., KUMAR B., SINGH A., KUMAR B., ANUPAMA G.C. and PANDEY S.B.

Abstract (from CDS):

We present photometry, polarimetry, and spectroscopy of the Type II supernova ASASSN-16ab/SN 2016B in PGC 037392. The photometric and spectroscopic follow-up commenced about 2 weeks after shock breakout and continued until nearly 6 months. The light curve of SN 2016B exhibits intermediate properties between those of Type IIP and IIL. The early decline is steep (1.68 ± 0.10 mag 100 d–1), followed by a shallower plateau phase (0.47 ± 0.24 mag 100 d–1). The optically thick phase lasts for 118 d, similar to Type IIP. The 56Ni mass estimated from the radioactive tail of the bolometric light curve is 0.082 ± 0.019 M. High-velocity component contributing to the absorption trough of H α and H β in the photospheric spectra are identified from the spectral modelling from about 57-97 d after the outburst, suggesting a possible SN ejecta and circumstellar material interaction. Such high-velocity features are common in the spectra of Type IIL supernovae. By modelling the true bolometric light curve of SN 2016B, we estimated a total ejected mass of ∼15 M, kinetic energy of ∼1.4 foe, and an initial radius of ∼400 R.

Abstract Copyright: © 2019 The Author(s) Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society

Journal keyword(s): techniques: photometric - techniques: polarimetric - techniques: spectroscopic - supernovae: general - supernovae: individual: ASASSN-16ab/SN 2016B - galaxies: individual: PGC 037392

Simbad objects: 27

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2019.10.17-13:31:21

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