2002A&A...387..977F


Query : 2002A&A...387..977F

2002A&A...387..977F - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 387, 977-992 (2002/6-1)

The history of mass dispersal around Herbig Ae/Be stars.

FUENTE A., MARTIN-PINTADO J., BACHILLER R., RODRIGUEZ-FRANCO A. and PALLA F.

Abstract (from CDS):

We present a systematic study of the material surrounding intermediate-mass stars. Our sample includes 34 Herbig Ae/Be (HAEBE) stars of different ages and luminosities. This is a quite complete representation of the whole class of HAEBE stars and consequently, our conclusions should have a solid statistical meaning. In addition, we have observed 2 intermediate-mass protostars and included published data on 15 protostellar objects in order to determine the evolution of the circumstellar material in the early stages of stellar evolution. All the HAEBE stars have been classified according with the three Types already defined in Fuente et al. (1998A&A...334..253F): Type I stars are immersed in a dense clump and have associated bipolar outflows, their ages are ∼0.1Myr; Type II stars are still immersed in the molecular cloud though not in a dense clump, their ages are between ∼a few 0.1 to ∼a few Myr; Type III stars have completely dispersed the surrounding material and are located in a cavity of the molecular cloud, their ages are >1Myr. Our observations are used to reconstruct the evolution of the circumstellar material around intermediate-mass stars and investigate the mass dispersal mechanisms at the different stages of the stellar evolution. Our results can be summarized as follows: intermediate-mass stars disperse ≥90% of the mass of the parent clump during the protostellar phase. During this phase, the energetic outflows sweep out the gas and dust forming a biconical cavity while the equatorial material is infalling to feed the circumstellar disk and eventually the protostar. In this way, the density structure of the parent clump remains well described by a density law n∝rβ with -2<β←1 although a large fraction of the mass is dispersed. In ∼a few 0.1Myr, the star becomes visible and the outflow fades. Some material is dispersed from ∼a few 0.1 to ≥1Myr. Since the outflow declines and the stars are still too cold to generate UV photons, stellar winds are expected to be the only dispersal mechanism at work. In 1Myr an early-type star (B0-B5) and in ≥1 to 10Myr a late-type star (later than B6) meets the ZAMS. Now the star is hot enough to produce UV photons and starts excavating the molecular cloud. Significant differences exist between early-type and late-type stars at this evolutionary stage. Only early-type stars are able to create large (R>0.08 pc) cavities in the molecular cloud, producing a dramatic change in the morphology of the region. This difference is easily understood if photodissociation plays an important role in the mass dispersal around these objects.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): stars: formation - stars: pre-main sequence - ISM: abundances - ISM: molecules

Simbad objects: 57

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Number of rows : 57
N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2024
#notes
1 EM* LkHA 198 Ae* 00 11 25.8495450336 +58 49 28.713961920   14.65 13.79 14.03   B9e 223 0
2 LBN 119.83-06.05 MoC 00 28 43.5075 +56 41 56.868           ~ 69 0
3 BD+61 154 Ae* 00 43 18.2566590360 +61 54 40.139212716 10.83 11.13 10.60     B8eq 203 1
4 NAME RNO 6NW MCld MoC 02 15 57.1 +55 28 12           A5 4 0
5 HBC 334 Em* 02 16 30.7111817472 +55 23 00.139141680   14.92 14.32 14.52   B3 34 0
6 NAME LDN 1455 IRS 1 cor 03 27 39.08 +30 13 03.1           ~ 161 0
7 NAME HH 7-11 FIR 03 29 03.9 +31 16 06           ~ 351 0
8 IRAS 03445+3242 Y*O 03 47 41.603 +32 51 43.79           ~ 201 0
9 V* V892 Tau Ae* 04 18 40.6157618376 +28 19 15.625058880   16.6 14.69 14.35   A0Ve 297 0
10 RAFGL 5123 Y*O 04 31 34.07736 +18 08 04.9020           K3V/M3III 864 0
11 V* AB Aur Ae* 04 55 45.8458932216 +30 33 04.292077032 7.20 7.16 7.05 6.96 6.70 A0Ve 1068 2
12 V* HK Ori Ae* 05 31 28.049808 +12 09 10.30212 11.82 12.235 11.716 11.632 10.56 A2?e+G0?e 193 1
13 HD 245185 Ae* 05 35 09.6034684104 +10 01 51.465413208 10.05 10.07 9.93     A0Vae 127 0
14 V* T Ori Ae* 05 35 50.4482802768 -05 28 34.925254536 12.724 11.637 11.248 10.09 10.043 A8VnekA1mA2_lB 247 0
15 V* BF Ori Ae* 05 37 13.2623828280 -06 35 00.568242528 10.37 10.00 9.69 10.06 9.31 A7III 293 0
16 * ome Ori Be* 05 39 11.1457980782 +04 07 17.288290296 3.73 4.48 4.59 4.57 4.67 B3Ve 408 1
17 V* RR Tau Ae* 05 39 30.5115918672 +26 22 26.967444996 11.64 12.09 11.28 10.58 10.17 A0:IVe 225 0
18 NGC 2071 RNe 05 47 10 +00 18.0           ~ 646 1
19 NAME G 192.16 cor 05 58 13.53 +16 31 58.3           ~ 21 1
20 HD 250550 Ae* 06 01 59.9892055464 +16 30 56.727549864   9.60 9.593 9.64   B9e 244 1
21 NAME Mon R2 HII 06 07 47.58 -06 22 42.6           ~ 744 2
22 EM* LkHA 208 Ae* 06 07 49.5332003976 +18 39 26.487297072   11.78 11.30 11.39   F0Ve 123 1
23 EM* MWC 137 Ae* 06 18 45.5220873216 +15 16 52.244494608 12.89 13.30 13.759 11.67 10.31 sgB[e]d 245 1
24 EM* LkHA 215 Ae* 06 32 41.7730499472 +10 09 34.209036180 11.41 11.28 10.70     B7IIne 128 0
25 HD 259431 Ae* 06 33 05.1906369144 +10 19 19.982565336 8.39 8.95 8.72     B6ep 286 1
26 EM* LkHA 25 Ae* 06 40 44.6376365304 +09 48 02.151653868 12.745 13.03 18.85 12.545 12.386 B4Ve 145 0
27 HD 52721 Ae* 07 01 49.50977 -11 18 03.3219 5.88 6.65 6.59 7.52   B2Vne 219 0
28 EM* LkHA 218 Ae* 07 02 42.5309892768 -11 26 11.826714804   13 11.63     A0e 64 0
29 V* Z CMa Ae* 07 03 43.1599411656 -11 33 06.209065836 10.51 9.99 8.80     B5/8eq+F5/7 579 3
30 HD 53367 Ae* 07 04 25.5189757244 -10 27 15.613478141 6.81 7.40 6.96 7.92   B0IV/Ve 321 0
31 BD+36 2322B PM* 12 57 39.3125173002 +35 13 19.148808620   14.80 13.16 12.939   M4.5Ve 97 1
32 BD+36 2322 BY* 12 57 40.2569835641 +35 13 29.629213095   12.02 10.52 10.137   M0V+M4/5V 230 1
33 NAME Ophiuchus Molecular Cloud SFR 16 28 06 -24 32.5           ~ 3636 1
34 IRAS 16293-2422 cor 16 32 22.56 -24 28 31.8           ~ 1255 1
35 NAME GGD 27 IRS RNe 18 19 12.0870647616 -20 47 50.901137556           ~ 26 1
36 EM* MWC 297 Ae* 18 27 39.5265500160 -03 49 52.133050776 15.57 14.34 12.31 11.34   B1.5Ve 297 0
37 V* VV Ser Ae* 18 28 47.8620017808 +00 08 39.923474964 12.99 12.63 11.80 11.01 10.24 A5Ve 249 0
38 NAME Serpens Cloud SFR 18 29 49 +01 14.8           ~ 1103 2
39 Parsamian 21 Or* 19 29 00.8740757136 +09 38 42.862226208   15.18 14.07 13.93   F5Iabe 91 0
40 IRAS 20126+4104 Y*O 20 14 25.8816769656 +41 13 36.879427236           B2.5-B0.5 441 0
41 RAFGL 2591 Y*O 20 29 24.8230 +40 11 19.590           ~ 622 0
42 V* PV Cep Or* 20 45 53.9540390184 +67 57 38.679941304   19.27 17.46 15.98 14.60 A5 270 1
43 HD 200775 Ae* 21 01 36.9205762896 +68 09 47.789578836 7.34 7.754 7.427 8.13   B2Ve 558 0
44 BD+65 1637 Ae* 21 42 50.1798725784 +66 06 35.186616864 10.21 10.56 10.53 10.29   B3IV-Vne 157 1
45 NGC 7129 OpC 21 42 58 +66 06.8     11.5     ~ 260 0
46 EM* LkHA 234 Ae* 21 43 06.8218113480 +66 06 54.202272804 13.65 13.61 12.73 11.98 11.20 B5Ve 286 0
47 NAME NGC 7129 FIR 2 IR 21 44 01.5 +66 03 40           ~ 98 0
48 BD+46 3471 Ae* 21 52 34.0992801288 +47 13 43.605617340 10.72 10.56 10.15     A0.5IIIer 210 1
49 EM* LkHA 257 Ae* 21 54 18.7801883568 +47 12 09.667447308 15.195 13.87 13.16     B5/A2e 58 0
50 SH 2-140 OpC 22 19 07.8 +63 17 07           ~ 658 2
51 IRAS 22176+6303 Y*O 22 19 18.23 +63 18 47.5           ~ 595 0
52 EM* LkHA 233 Ae* 22 34 40.9923134958 +40 40 04.251892858   14.5       A7Ve 146 0
53 HD 216629 Ae* 22 53 15.6041662488 +62 08 45.000921228 9.83 9.93 9.36 9.31   B3IVe+A3 137 0
54 NAME Cepheus A SFR 22 56 17.9 +62 01 49           ~ 741 2
55 EM* AS 505 Ae* 23 05 07.4612179272 +62 15 36.504610992 10.09 11.142 10.283 10.075   B5Vep 64 0
56 EM* MWC 1080 Ae* 23 17 25.5895018656 +60 50 43.444557384   13.24 11.85 11.251   B0eq 323 0
57 Mol 160 Rad 23 40 54.5 +61 10 28           ~ 105 0

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