2009A&A...506..369B


Query : 2009A&A...506..369B

2009A&A...506..369B - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 506, 369-375 (2009/10-4)

An analysis of the transit times of CoRoT-1b.

BEAN J.L.

Abstract (from CDS):

The CoRoT satellite is expected to discover tens of new transiting exoplanets during its mission. For each of these planets there will be a resulting long, continuous sequence of transit times that can be used to search for perturbations arising from an additional planet in the system. I report the results from a study of the transit times for CoRoT-1b, which was one of the first planets discovered by CoRoT. Analysis of the pipeline-reduced CoRoT light curve yields a new determination of the physical and orbital parameters of planet and star, along with 35 individual transit times at a typical precision of 36s. I estimate a planet-to-star radius ratio of Rp/R*=0.1433±0.0010, a ratio of the planet's orbital semimajor axis to the host star radius of a/R*=4.751±0.045, and an orbital inclination for the planet of i=83.88°±0.29°. The observed transit times are consistent with CoRoT-1b having a constant period and there is no evidence of an additional planet in the system. I use the observed constancy of the transit times to set limits on the mass of a hypothetical additional planet in a nearby, stable orbit. I ascertain that the most stringent limits (4 M at 3σ confidence) can be placed on planets residing in a 1:2 mean motion resonance with the transiting planet. In contrast, the data yield less stringent limits on planets near a 1:3 mean motion resonance (5MJup at 3σ confidence) than in the surrounding parameter space. In addition, I use a simulation to investigate what sensitivity to additional planets could be obtained from the analysis of data measured for a similar system during a CoRoT long run (100 sequential transit times). I find that for such a scenario, planets with masses greater than twice that of Mars (0.2M) in a 1:2 mean motion resonance would cause high-significance transit time deviations. Therefore, such planets could be detected or ruled out using CoRoT long run data. I conclude that CoRoT data will indeed be very useful for searching for planets with the transit timing method.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): techniques: photometric - eclipses - stars: individual: CoRoT-1 - planetary systems

Simbad objects: 10

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Number of rows : 10
N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2023
#notes
1 CoRoT-1 * 06 48 19.1723766840 -03 06 07.710745140     13.6 13.44 12.88 G0V 120 2
2 CoRoT-1b Pl 06 48 19.1724141241 -03 06 07.710423478           ~ 168 1
3 CoRoT-4 * 06 48 46.7134456728 -00 40 21.969631416       13.42   F0V 68 1
4 OGLE-TR 111 V* 10 53 17.8069115424 -61 24 20.607791112     16.96 16.05 15.55 G 92 1
5 Ross 905 PM* 11 42 11.0933350978 +26 42 23.650782778   12.06 10.613 10.272 8.24 M3V 592 1
6 NAME V672 Lyr b Pl 19 04 09.8516024106 +36 37 57.445911611           ~ 325 1
7 HD 189733 BY* 20 00 43.7129433648 +22 42 39.073143456 9.241 8.578 7.648 7.126 6.68 K2V 834 1
8 HD 189733b Pl 20 00 43.7130382888 +22 42 39.071811263           ~ 1323 1
9 HD 209458 V* 22 03 10.7727465312 +18 53 03.549393384   8.21 7.63     F9V 1070 1
10 HD 209458b Pl 22 03 10.7729598762 +18 53 03.548248479           ~ 1741 1

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2023.01.27-22:24:42

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