2010A&A...523A..69R


C.D.S. - SIMBAD4 rel 1.7 - 2019.08.22CEST18:41:54

2010A&A...523A..69R - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 523, A69-69 (2010/11-2)

Detectability of giant planets in protoplanetary disks by CO emission lines.

REGALY Z., SANDOR Z., DULLEMOND C.P. and VAN BOEKEL R.

Abstract (from CDS):

Planets are thought to form in protoplanetary accretion disks around young stars. Detecting a giant planet still embedded in a protoplanetary disk would be very important and give observational constraints on the planet-formation process. However, detecting these planets with the radial velocity technique is problematic owing to the strong stellar activity of these young objects. We intend to provide an indirect method to detect Jovian planets by studying near infrared emission spectra originating in the protoplanetary disks around TTauri stars. Our idea is to investigate whether a massive planet could induce any observable effect on the spectral lines emerging in the disks atmosphere. As a tracer molecule we propose CO, which is excited in the ro-vibrational fundamental band in the disk atmosphere to a distance of ∼2-3AU (depending on the stellar mass) where terrestrial planets are thought to form. We developed a semi-analytical model to calculate synthetic molecular spectral line profiles in a protoplanetary disk using a double layer disk model heated on the outside by irradiation by the central star and in the midplane by viscous dissipation due to accretion. 2D gas dynamics were incorporated in the calculation of synthetic spectral lines. The motions of gas parcels were calculated by the publicly available hydrodynamical code FARGO which was developed to study planet-disk interactions. We demonstrate that a massive planet embedded in a protoplanetary disk strongly influences the originally circular Keplerian gas dynamics. The perturbed motion of the gas can be detected by comparing the CO line profiles in emission, which emerge from planet-bearing to those of planet-free disk models. The planet signal has two major characteristics: a permanent line profile asymmetry, and short timescale variability correlated with the orbital phase of the giant planet. We have found that the strength of the asymmetry depends on the physical parameters of the star-planet-disk system, such as the disk inclination angle, the planetary and stellar masses, the orbital distance, and the size of the disk inner cavity. The permanent line profile asymmetry is caused by a disk in an eccentric state in the gap opened by the giant planet. However, the variable component is a consequence of the local dynamical perturbation by the orbiting giant planet. We show that a forming giant planet, still embedded in the protoplanetary disk, can be detected using contemporary or future high-resolution near-IR spectrographs like VLT/CRIRES and ELT/METIS.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): accretion, accretion disks - line: profiles - stars: variables: T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be - planetary systems - methods: numerical - techniques: spectroscopic

Simbad objects: 27

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Number of rows : 27

N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2019
#notes
1 IC 348 OpC 03 44 34 +32 09.8           ~ 1197 1
2 V* HL Tau TT* 04 31 38.437 +18 13 57.65   16.02 15.10 14.21   K5 1111 0
3 IRAS 04287+1807 mul 04 31 38.8 +18 13 57           ~ 797 0
4 V* AA Tau TT* 04 34 55.4222683130 +24 28 53.038273587 13.14 13.34 12.20     K5Ve 596 0
5 V* DR Tau TT* 04 47 06.2152696011 +16 58 42.814250257 12.03 11.86 10.50 12.19   K5Ve 461 0
6 V* V836 Tau TT* 05 03 06.5988350466 +25 23 19.604482133   14.66       K7/M0Ve 198 0
7 NAME Trapezium Cluster As* 05 35 16.5 -05 23 14           ~ 1422 1
8 M 36 OpC 05 36 18 +34 08.4   6.09 6.0     ~ 150 2
9 LDN 1641 MoC 05 39.0 -07 00           ~ 416 0
10 NAME Ori GMC MoC 05 41 -01.1           ~ 38 0
11 NGC 2024 Cl* 05 41 43 -01 50.5           ~ 1049 1
12 NAME LDN 1630N Cl* 05 46 47.0 +00 09 50           ~ 10 1
13 * bet Pic PM* 05 47 17.0876901 -51 03 59.441135 4.13 4.03 3.86 3.74 3.58 A6V 1588 1
14 HD 44627 BY* 06 19 12.9129838711 -58 03 15.524890610   10.01 9.205   8.185 K1V(e) 128 2
15 NGC 2264 OpC 06 40 58 +09 53.7     3.9     ~ 1536 1
16 NGC 2362 OpC 07 18 41 -24 57.3     4.1     ~ 351 0
17 NAME TW Hya b Pl? 11 01 51.9054298616 -34 42 17.031550898           ~ 8 1
18 V* CT Cha Or* 11 04 09.0989057683 -76 27 19.326914289   13.44 13.00   10.89 K7Ve 105 1
19 TWA 27 BD* 12 07 33.467 -39 32 54.00     19.95 17.99 15.88 M8Ve 302 1
20 CPD-36 6759 Y*O 15 15 48.4459023859 -37 09 16.026315179   9.21 8.708     F8V 324 1
21 CD-35 10525 TT* 15 49 12.102 -35 39 05.12 12.19 12.36 11.40     K7Ve 228 1
22 UScoCTIO 108 BD* 16 05 54.0747365035 -18 18 44.380483038           M7 32 2
23 EM* AS 205 TT* 16 11 31.343 -18 38 26.00   13.98 12.63 12.81   K0e+K5e 231 0
24 EM* SR 21A TT* 16 27 10.2776332501 -24 19 12.620553212   16.08 14.10     G1 220 1
25 SCR J1845-6357 PM* 18 45 05.2506866871 -63 57 47.458544682   19.05 17.40 14.99 12.46 M8.5V 55 1
26 * alf PsA ** 22 57 39.04625 -29 37 20.0533 1.31 1.25 1.16 1.11 1.09 A4V 1093 3
27 HD 218396 El* 23 07 28.7156905667 +21 08 03.302133882   6.21 5.953     F0+VkA5mA5 846 1

    Equat.    Gal    SGal    Ecl

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2019.08.22-18:41:54

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