2011A&A...534A.108K


C.D.S. - SIMBAD4 rel 1.7 - 2019.11.12CET00:56:31

2011A&A...534A.108K - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 534A, 108-108 (2011/10-1)

The SEDs and host galaxies of the dustiest GRB afterglows.

KRUEHLER T., GREINER J., SCHADY P., SAVAGLIO S., AFONSO P.M.J., CLEMENS C., ELLIOTT J., FILGAS R., GRUBER D., KANN D.A., KLOSE S., KUEPCUE-YOLDAS A., McBREEN S., OLIVARES F., PIERINI D., RAU A., ROSSI A., NARDINI M., NICUESA GUELBENZU A., SUDILOVSKY V. and UPDIKE A.C.

Abstract (from CDS):

The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe. Until recently, however, the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows, biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (AVGRB> 1mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry, and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies, and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line and galaxy-integrated characteristics such as the host's stellar mass, luminosity, color-excess, and star-formation rate. For the eight afterglows considered in this study, we report for the first time the redshift of GRB 081109 (z=0.9787±0.0005), and the visual extinction towards GRBs 081109 (AVGRB=3.4–0.3+0.4mag) and 100621A (AVGRB=3.8±0.2mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs, there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metal-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder (<(R-K)AB≳1.6mag), more luminous (<L≳0.9L*), and massive (<logM* [M]≳9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. Hence, we probe a different galaxy population, suggesting that previous host samples miss most of the massive and metal-rich members. This also indicates that the dust along the sight-line is often related to host properties, and thus probably located in the diffuse ISM or interstellar clouds and not in the immediate GRB environment. Some of the hosts in our sample, are blue, young, or of low stellar mass illustrating that even apparently non-extinguished galaxies possess very dusty sight-lines owing to a patchy dust distribution. The afterglows and host galaxies of the dustiest GRBs provide evidence of a complex dust geometry in star-forming galaxies. In addition, they establish a population of luminous, massive, and correspondingly chemically evolved GRB hosts. This suggests that GRBs trace the global star-formation rate better than studies based on optically selected host samples indicate, and that the previously claimed deficiency of high-mass hosts was at least partially a selection effect.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): gamma-ray burst: general - dust, extinction - galaxies: star formation

Nomenclature: Tables 2-4, 6-7: [KGS2011] GRB YYMMDDA host G N=8.

Simbad objects: 24

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Number of rows : 24

N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2020
#notes
1 WG 2 WD* 00 50 03.6494717240 -52 08 15.515729263 13.354 14.157 14.206 14.31 14.428 DA2.7 72 0
2 NAME SMC G 00 52 38.0 -72 48 01   2.79 2.2     ~ 9102 1
3 GRB 070802 gB 02 27 35.91 -55 31 39.1           ~ 132 0
4 [EFH2009] GRB 070802 host G G 02 27 35.91 -55 31 39.1       25.03   ~ 3 0
5 NAME Magellanic Clouds GrG 03 00 -71.0           ~ 5384 1
6 [KGS2011] GRB 090926B host G G 03 05 13.91 -39 00 22.6 23.71         ~ 4 0
7 GRB 090926B gB 03 05 14.30 -38 59 50.9           ~ 107 1
8 NAME LMC G 05 23 34.6 -69 45 22     0.4     ~ 14338 1
9 GRB 070306 gB 09 52 23.220 +10 28 55.20           ~ 171 1
10 SDSS J095223.31+102855.4 G 09 52 23.32 +10 28 55.4       23.00   ~ 7 0
11 [CPW2010] GRB 080607 host G G 12 59 47.14 +15 55 09.6           ~ 3 0
12 GRB 080607 gB 12 59 47.14 +15 55 09.6           ~ 201 0
13 GRB 080605 gB 17 28 30.04 +04 00 56.9           ~ 146 0
14 [KGS2011] GRB 080605 host G G 17 28 30.05 +04 00 56.0           ~ 3 0
15 GRB 080603A gB 18 37 37.95 +62 44 39.6           ~ 68 0
16 [KGS2011] GRB 080805 host G G 20 56 53.43 -62 26 39.3     25.7 25.5   ~ 2 0
17 GRB 080805 gB 20 56 55.30 -62 25 58.8           ~ 77 0
18 [UNN2010] GRB 100621A host G G 21 01 13.08 -51 06 22.5           ~ 3 0
19 GRB 100621A gB 21 01 13.12 -51 06 22.5           ~ 140 0
20 [KGS2011] GRB 081109 host G G 22 03 09.63 -54 42 39.9 23.23   22.85   21.96 ~ 3 0
21 GRB 081109A gB 22 03 11.50 -54 42 40.5           ~ 85 1
22 GRB 081029 gB 23 07 06 -68 10.7           ~ 88 0
23 GRB 081109B gB 23 20 31.80 -55 54 42.8           ~ 6 0
24 NAME Local Group GrG ~ ~           ~ 6674 0

    Equat.    Gal    SGal    Ecl

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2019.11.12-00:56:31

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