2014A&A...566A.126M


C.D.S. - SIMBAD4 rel 1.7 - 2020.07.04CEST15:24:05

2014A&A...566A.126M - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 566A, 126-126 (2014/6-1)

Search for cool giant exoplanets around young and nearby stars. VLT/NaCo near-infrared phase-coronagraphic and differential imaging.

MAIRE A.-L., BOCCALETTI A., RAMEAU J., CHAUVIN G., LAGRANGE A.-M., BONNEFOY M., DESIDERA S., SYLVESTRE M., BAUDOZ P., GALICHER R. and MOUILLET D.

Abstract (from CDS):

Spectral differential imaging (SDI) is part of the observing strategy of current and future high-contrast imaging instruments. It aims to reduce the stellar speckles that prevent the detection of cool planets by using in/out methane-band images. It attenuates the signature of off-axis companions to the star, such as angular differential imaging (ADI). However, this attenuation depends on the spectral properties of the low-mass companions we are searching for. The implications of this particularity on estimating the detection limits have been poorly explored so far. We perform an imaging survey to search for cool (Teff <1000-1300K) giant planets at separations as close as 5-10AU. We also aim to assess the sensitivity limits in SDI data taking the photometric bias into account. This will lead to a better view of the SDI performance. We observed a selected sample of 16 stars (age <200Myr, distance <25pc) with the phase-mask coronagraph, SDI, and ADI modes of VLT/NaCo. We do not detect any companions. As for the estimation of the sensitivity limits, we argue that the SDI residual noise cannot be converted into mass limits because it represents a differential flux, unlike what is done for single-band images, in which fluxes are measured. This results in degeneracies for the mass limits, which may be removed with the use of single-band constraints. We instead employ a method of directly determining the mass limits and compare the results from a combined processing SDI-ADI (ASDI) and ADI. The SDI flux ratio of a planet is the critical parameter for the ASDI performance at close-in separations (≲1''). The survey is sensitive to cool giant planets beyond 10AU for 65% and 30AU for 100% of the sample. For close-in separations, the optimal regime for SDI corresponds to SDI flux ratios higher than ∼2. According to the BT-Settl model, this translates into Teff≲800K, which is significantly lower than the methane condensation temperature (∼1300K). The methods described here can be applied to the data interpretation of SPHERE. In particular, we expect better performance with the dual-band imager IRDIS, thanks to more suitable filter characteristics and better image quality.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): planetary systems - instrumentation: adaptive optics - methods: observational - methods: data analysis - techniques: high angular resolution - techniques: image processing

Simbad objects: 27

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Number of rows : 27

N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2020
#notes
1 NAME THA As* 00 00 -62.0           ~ 340 0
2 V* EX Cet BY* 01 37 35.4668233260 -06 45 37.531277337 8.862 8.459 7.656 7.218 6.817 K0/1V 109 0
3 * q01 Eri PM* 01 42 29.3148822519 -53 44 26.991165270   6.05 5.52     F9V 263 1
4 * phi Eri PM* 02 16 30.5856318 -51 30 43.795513 3.06 3.45 3.57 3.64 3.75 B8IV 135 0
5 CD-28 1030 Fl* 03 07 55.7522689086 -28 13 10.963771909 12.755 11.716 10.291 9.365 8.372 M1Ve 54 1
6 HD 25457 TT* 04 02 36.7451443573 -00 16 08.118566607   5.88 5.38     F7V 237 0
7 2MASSI J0415195-093506 BD* 04 15 19.54368 -09 35 06.6732           T8.0 147 0
8 * pi.01 Ori PM* 04 54 53.7287660 +10 09 02.995200   4.723 4.648     A0Va_lB 237 0
9 * zet Lep * 05 46 57.3409587 -14 49 19.019943   3.637 3.525     A2IV-V(n) 279 0
10 HD 45270 PM* 06 22 30.9412022189 -60 13 07.143258224 7.186 7.11 6.508   5.87 G1V 101 0
11 ULAS J130041.74+122114.7 BD* 13 00 42.08415 +12 21 15.0536         23.28 T8.5p 100 0
12 * e Vir b Pl 13 16 46.5161591991 +09 25 26.967205938           ~ 78 1
13 NAME beta Pic Moving Group MGr 14 30 -42.0           ~ 557 0
14 * g Lup PM* 15 41 11.3769921 -44 39 40.342813   5.04 4.64     F3/5V 178 0
15 HD 189245 PM* 20 00 20.2490835420 -33 42 12.427710024   6.15 5.66     F7V 94 0
16 V* AU Mic BY* 20 45 09.5323695486 -31 20 27.241710746   10.05 8.627 9.078 6.593 M1VeBa1 893 0
17 BD+22 4409 BY* 21 31 01.7141405072 +23 20 07.370852589   10.28 9.253 8.6 7.965 K3Vke 152 0
18 V* HN Peg B BD* 21 44 28.47168 +14 46 07.7988           T2.5 101 0
19 V* HN Peg BY* 21 44 31.3299733695 +14 46 18.982331039       6.16   G0V+ 449 0
20 CFBDS J214947-040308 BD* 21 49 47.20 -04 03 08.9           T7 26 0
21 * alf PsA ** 22 57 39.04625 -29 37 20.0533 1.31 1.25 1.16 1.11 1.09 A4V 1113 3
22 HD 217987 PM* 23 05 52.0354545522 -35 51 11.058757520   8.82 7.34     M2V 217 0
23 HD 218396 El* 23 07 28.7156905667 +21 08 03.302133882   6.21 5.953     F0+VkA5mA5 896 0
24 HD 224228 PM* 23 56 10.6732720614 -39 03 08.409993692 9.977 9.21 8.225 7.669 7.194 K2V 67 0
25 NAME AB Dor Moving Group MGr ~ ~           ~ 355 0
26 NAME Castor Moving Group As* ~ ~           ~ 116 1
27 NAME Hercules-Lyra Moving Group MGr ~ ~           ~ 53 0

    Equat.    Gal    SGal    Ecl

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2020.07.04-15:24:05

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