2014A&A...567A..44B


C.D.S. - SIMBAD4 rel 1.7 - 2020.07.04CEST15:09:15

2014A&A...567A..44B - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 567A, 44-44 (2014/7-1)

Multiwavelength campaign on Mrk 509. XIII. Testing ionized-reflection models on Mrk 509.

BOISSAY R., PALTANI S., PONTI G., BIANCHI S., CAPPI M., KAASTRA J.S., PETRUCCI P.-O., ARAV N., BRANDUARDI-RAYMONT G., COSTANTINI E., EBRERO J., KRISS G.A., MEHDIPOUR M., PINTO C. and STEENBRUGGE K.C.

Abstract (from CDS):

Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are the most luminous persistent objects in the universe. The X-ray domain is particularly important because the X-ray flux represents a significant fraction of the bolometric emission from such objects and probes the innermost regions of accretion disks, where most of this power is generated. An excess of X-ray emission below ∼2keV, called soft-excess, is very common in Type 1 AGN spectra. The origin of this feature remains debated. Originally modeled with a blackbody, there are now several possibilities to model the soft-excess, including warm Comptonization and blurred ionized reflection. In this paper, we test ionized-reflection models on Mrk 509, a bright Seyfert 1 galaxy for which we have a unique data set, in order to determine whether it can be responsible for the strong soft-excess. We use ten simultaneous XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL observations performed every four days. We present here the results of the spectral analysis, the evolution of the parameters, and the variability properties of the X-ray emission. The application of blurred ionized-reflection models leads to a very strong reflection and an extreme geometry, but fails to reproduce the broad-band spectrum of Mrk 509. Two different scenarios for blurred ionized reflection are discussed: stable geometry and lamp-post configuration. In both cases we find that the model parameters do not follow the expected relations, indicating that the model is fine-tuned to fit the data without physical justification. A large, slow variation in the soft-excess without a counterpart in the hard X-rays could be explained by a change in ionization of the reflector. However, such a change does not naturally follow from the assumed geometrical configuration. Warm Comptonization remains the most probable origin of the soft-excess in this object. Nevertheless, it is possible that both ionized reflection and warm Comptonization mechanisms can explain the soft-excess in all objects, one dominating the other one, depending on the physical conditions of the disk and the corona.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): galaxies: active - galaxies: nuclei - galaxies: Seyfert - galaxies: individual: Mrk 509 - X-rays: galaxies

Simbad objects: 24

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Number of rows : 24

N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2020
#notes
1 Mrk 335 Sy1 00 06 19.5371542746 +20 12 10.617456059   14.19 13.85     ~ 1091 0
2 ESO 113-10 Sy1 01 05 16.8725940848 -58 26 15.265543353   14.63 14.6 13.35   ~ 50 0
3 2MASS J01365444-3509524 Sy1 01 36 54.4577149075 -35 09 52.330090067   18.80 18.0 17.80   ~ 42 0
4 LB 1727 Sy1 04 26 00.7188445954 -57 12 01.772037544 13.68 14.58 14.37 14.8   ~ 235 0
5 Mrk 1095 Sy1 05 16 11.4093760763 -00 08 59.158774578   14.30 13.92     ~ 775 1
6 QSO B0558-5026 BLL 05 59 47.3917733375 -50 26 52.026945176   15.18 14.97     ~ 243 1
7 4U 0708-49 Sy1 07 08 41.4887418009 -49 33 06.308287663   16.02 15.7 12.7   ~ 422 0
8 ESO 434-40 Sy2 09 47 40.1345889569 -30 56 55.959492708   14.10 13.69 12.44   ~ 486 0
9 7C 103144.10+395402.00 Sy1 10 34 38.5975589813 +39 38 28.181434249   17.37 16.90     ~ 303 1
10 NGC 4051 Sy1 12 03 09.6098828919 +44 31 52.693714606   11.08 12.92 9.94   ~ 1991 1
11 2E 2584 Sy1 12 04 42.1097577213 +27 54 11.867990165   15.64 15.60     ~ 351 0
12 NGC 4151 Sy1 12 10 32.5771747733 +39 24 21.057727323   12.18 11.48     ~ 3379 2
13 PB 3894 Sy1 12 14 17.6737003918 +14 03 13.182526431   14.46 14.19     ~ 738 0
14 NGC 4253 Sy1 12 18 26.5155239433 +29 48 46.518670434   14.34 13.57     ~ 930 1
15 ESO 383-35 Sy1 13 35 53.7686909139 -34 17 44.139127597   13.89 13.61 8.9   ~ 1378 0
16 2E 3140 Sy1 13 48 34.9544288185 +26 31 09.794884131   17.86 17.43     ~ 42 0
17 Mrk 279 Sy1 13 53 03.4356451470 +69 18 29.410672989   15.15 14.46     ~ 693 0
18 NGC 5548 Sy1 14 17 59.5401093128 +25 08 12.600227883   14.35 13.73     ~ 2391 0
19 Mrk 478 Sy1 14 42 07.4713423763 +35 26 22.939531895   14.91 14.58     ~ 484 0
20 Mrk 841 Sy1 15 04 01.1935077982 +10 26 15.778741853   14.50 14.27     ~ 583 0
21 V* V818 Sco LXB 16 19 55.0688745859 -15 38 25.019920749 11.60 12.40 11.1     Oev 1525 0
22 Mrk 509 Sy1 20 44 09.7504131334 -10 43 24.724854084   13.35 13.12 10.7   ~ 1128 0
23 NGC 7314 Sy1 22 35 46.1969940596 -26 03 01.574026329   11.62 13.11 10.61 11.4 ~ 504 0
24 UGC 12163 Sy1 22 42 39.3364258078 +29 43 31.301194419   14.86 14.16     ~ 614 1

    Equat.    Gal    SGal    Ecl

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2020.07.04-15:09:15

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