2015A&A...575A..64N


C.D.S. - SIMBAD4 rel 1.7 - 2021.01.26CET01:21:55

2015A&A...575A..64N - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 575A, 64-64 (2015/3-1)

Efficiency of ETV diagrams as diagnostic tools for long-term period variations. II. Non-conservative mass transfer, and gravitational radiation.

NANOURIS N., KALIMERIS A., ANTONOPOULOU E. and ROVITHIS-LIVANIOU H.

Abstract (from CDS):

The credibility of an eclipse timing variation (ETV) diagram analysis is investigated for various manifestations of the mass transfer and gravitational radiation processes in binary systems. The monotonicity of the period variations and the morphology of the respective ETV diagrams are thoroughly explored in both the direct impact and the accretion disk mode of mass transfer, accompanied by different types of mass and angular momentum losses (through a hot-spot emission from the gainer and via the L2/L3 points). Our primary objective concerns the traceability of each physical mechanism by means of an ETV diagram analysis. Also, possible critical mass ratio values are sought for those transfer modes that involve orbital angular momentum losses strong enough to dictate the secular period changes even when highly competitive mechanisms with the opposite direction act simultaneously. The {dot}(J)-{dot}(P) relation that governs the orbital evolution of a binary system is set to provide the exact solution for the period and the function expected to represent the subsequent eclipse timing variations. The angular momentum transport is parameterized through appropriate empirical relations, which are inferred from semi-analytical ballistic models. Then, we numerically determine the minimum temporal range over which a particular mechanism is rendered measurable, as well as the critical mass ratio values that signify monotonicity inversion in the period modulations. Mass transfer rates comparable to or greater than 10–8M☉/yr are measurable for typical noise levels of the ETV diagrams, regardless of whether the process is conservative. However, the presence of a transient disk around the more massive component defines a critical mass ratio (qcr≃0.83) above which the period turns out to decrease when still in the conservative regime, rendering the measurability of the anticipated variations a much more complicated task. The effects of gravitational radiation proved to be rather undetectable, except for systems with physical characteristics that only refer to cataclysmic variables. The monotonicity of the period variations and the curvature of the respective ETV diagrams depend strongly on the accretion mode and the degree of conservatism of the transfer process. Unlike the hot-spot effects, the Lagrangian points L2 and L3 support very efficient routes of strong angular momentum loss. It is further shown that escape of mass via the L3 point - when the donor is the less massive component - safely provides critical mass ratios above which the period is expected to decrease, no matter how intense the process is.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): binaries: close - accretion, accretion disks - gravitational waves - methods: miscellaneous

Simbad objects: 20

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Number of rows : 20

N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2021
#notes
1 V* X Tri Al* 02 00 33.7370769677 +27 53 19.205078722   9.30 9.00 8.50   A7V 216 0
2 V* Z Per Al* 02 40 03.2329982412 +42 11 57.694103071   10.25 10.06     A0 54 0
3 V* AF Gem EB* 06 50 39.6479385886 +21 21 55.959707220   11.05 10.82 10.64   A0 58 0
4 HD 50846 Al* 06 54 54.7083961175 -01 22 32.849416553   8.46 8.43     B5/7Ib 136 0
5 V* DQ Vel Al* 09 30 34.2074813756 -50 11 54.064561384   11.38 10.92     G4V+G4V 19 0
6 V* W UMa EB* 09 43 45.4704899627 +55 57 09.066718574   8.54 7.75     G2Vn 636 1
7 V* V712 Car bL* 10 23 58.0120989646 -57 45 48.938103165 15.466 15.473 13.5 12.6   O3If*/WN6+O3If*/WN6 149 1
8 V* CC Com EB* 12 12 06.0377635998 +22 31 58.684494436   13.09 11.42   10.085 K4/5V 196 0
9 V* IO UMa Al* 13 14 54.4470121556 +59 17 44.403349371   8.44 8.21     A3 26 0
10 V* TU Her Al* 17 13 35.3658793730 +30 42 36.042910325   11.24 10.792 10.877   A5 65 0
11 V* V393 Sco Al* 17 48 47.6025530213 -35 03 25.628506169   7.71 7.59     B3III 59 0
12 V* RY Sct Be* 18 25 31.4772031860 -12 41 24.196044092 10.25 10.38 9.12 9.46   O9.7Ibep 287 1
13 V* RR Dra Al* 18 41 47.4012704566 +62 40 34.944133995   10.013 9.831     A2 65 0
14 * bet Lyr EB* 18 50 04.7952472 +33 21 45.609978 2.85 3.42 3.42 3.31 3.29 B8.5Ib-II 891 0
15 HD 203069 Al* 21 20 16.0200764001 -10 48 08.125320777   9.258 8.874     A7V 76 0
16 V* DL Cyg Al* 21 39 46.4702848289 +48 32 23.887021470   9.87 9.66     B3V 29 0
17 V* AT Peg Al* 22 13 23.5167248011 +08 25 30.852347587   9.21 9.02     A6IV 111 0
18 V* AH Cep bL* 22 47 52.9411821102 +65 03 43.797787196 6.53 7.10 6.88     B0.2V+B2V 206 0
19 V* TY Peg Al* 23 29 57.0324292424 +13 32 31.485349478   10.46 10.21     F0V 55 0
20 V* Y Psc Al* 23 34 25.3848119966 +07 55 28.524974048   9.62 9.40     A3V+K0 99 0

    Equat.    Gal    SGal    Ecl

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2021.01.26-01:21:55

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