2017A&A...604A..67D


C.D.S. - SIMBAD4 rel 1.7 - 2020.01.29CET16:13:29

2017A&A...604A..67D - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 604A, 67-67 (2017/8-1)

The WISSH quasars project. II. Giant star nurseries in hyper-luminous quasars.

DURAS F., BONGIORNO A., PICONCELLI E., BIANCHI S., PAPPALARDO C., VALIANTE R., BISCHETTI M., FERUGLIO C., MARTOCCHIA S., SCHNEIDER R., VIETRI G., VIGNALI C., ZAPPACOSTA L., LA FRANCA F. and FIORE F.

Abstract (from CDS):

Context. Studying the coupling between the energy output produced by the central quasar and the host galaxy is fundamental to fully understand galaxy evolution. Quasar feedback is indeed supposed to dramatically affect the galaxy properties by depositing large amounts of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM).
Aims. In order to gain further insights on this process, we study the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of sources at the brightest end of the quasar luminosity function, for which the feedback mechanism is assumed to be at its maximum, given their high efficiency in driving powerful outflows.
Methods. We modelled the rest-frame UV-to-far-IR SEDs of 16 WISE-SDSS Selected Hyper-luminous (WISSH) quasars at 1.8<z<4.6 based on SDSS, 2MASS, WISE and Herschel/SPIRE data. Through an accurate SED-fitting procedure, we separate the different emission components by deriving physical parameters of both the nuclear component (i.e. bolometric and monochromatic luminosities) and the host galaxy (i.e. star formation rate, mass, and temperature of the cold dust). We also use a radiative transfer code to account for the contribution of the quasar-related emission to the far-IR fluxes.
Results. Most SEDs are well described by a standard combination of accretion disc plus torus and cold dust emission. However, about 30% of SEDs require an additional emission component in the near-IR, with temperatures peaking at ∼750K, which indicates that a hotter dust component is present in these powerful quasars. We measure extreme values of both AGN bolometric luminosity (LBOL>1047erg/s) and star formation rate (up to ∼2000M/yr) based on the quasar-corrected, IR luminosity of the host galaxy. A new relation between quasar and star formation luminosity is derived (LSF∝L0.73QSO) by combining several Herschel-detected quasar samples from z∼0 to ∼4. WISSH quasars have masses (∼108M) and temperatures (∼50K) of cold dust in agreement with those found for other high-z IR luminous quasars.
Conclusions. Thanks to their extreme nuclear and star formation luminosities, the WISSH quasars are ideal targets to shed light on the feedback mechanism and its effect on the evolution of their host galaxies, as well as on the merger-induced scenario that is commonly assumed to explain these exceptional luminosities. Future observations will be crucial to measure the molecular gas content in these systems, probe the effect between quasar-driven outflows and on-going star formation, and reveal merger signatures in their host galaxies.

Abstract Copyright: © ESO, 2017

Journal keyword(s): galaxies: active - galaxies: fundamental parameters - galaxies: star formation - quasars: general - quasars: general

Simbad objects: 17

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Number of rows : 17

N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2020
#notes
1 QSO J0124+0044 QSO 01 24 03.7793269746 +00 44 32.738646875   19.71 18.71 17.9   ~ 65 0
2 QSO B0207-0019 QSO 02 09 50.7146360498 -00 05 06.459317612   17.45 17.21     ~ 114 0
3 [VV2006] J073502.3+265911 QSO 07 35 02.3056069899 +26 59 11.532940903   17.01 16.68     ~ 29 0
4 QSO J0745+4734 QSO 07 45 21.7881463456 +47 34 36.191344902   16.76 16.44     ~ 81 0
5 QSO J0801+5210 QSO 08 01 17.7968518079 +52 10 34.600380950   17.41 17.04     ~ 41 0
6 SDSS J081855.78+095848.0 QSO 08 18 55.7830570576 +09 58 47.993991122   19.71 18.81     ~ 24 0
7 QSO B0900+42 QSO 09 00 33.5093000271 +42 15 47.031257024   17.63 17.18     ~ 59 0
8 [VV2006] J092819.2+534023 QSO 09 28 19.2824933325 +53 40 24.112151423   23.75 21.86     ~ 22 0
9 QSO B1013+0035 QSO 10 15 49.0050307145 +00 20 20.015448963   22.25 20.79     ~ 57 0
10 SDSS J114816.64+525150.3 QSO 11 48 16.647 +52 51 50.31   25.73 25.04     ~ 384 0
11 QSO J1215-0034 QSO 12 15 49.8118973656 -00 34 32.174769639   17.76 17.51     ~ 70 0
12 SDSS J123714.61+064759.6 QSO 12 37 14.6101756939 +06 47 59.610269423   19.66 19.15     ~ 44 0
13 LB 19 QSO 12 50 05.726 +26 31 07.51   16.12 15.92     ~ 183 0
14 QSO J1433+0227 QSO 14 33 52.2086962626 +02 27 13.984739230   22.31 20.74     ~ 34 0
15 HS 1700+6416 QSO 17 01 00.6195618802 +64 12 09.118927057   16.39 16.17     ~ 332 0
16 QSO J2123-0050 QSO 21 23 29.4639237667 -00 50 52.916067995   16.91 16.62     ~ 79 0
17 QSO J2346-0016 QSO 23 46 25.6713273667 -00 16 00.425283243   19.44 18.73     ~ 50 0

    Equat.    Gal    SGal    Ecl

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2020.01.29-16:13:29

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