2020A&A...640A..55A


C.D.S. - SIMBAD4 rel 1.7 - 2020.10.26CET14:45:19

2020A&A...640A..55A - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 640A, 55-55 (2020/8-1)

Exploiting periodic orbits as dynamical clues for Kepler and K2 systems.

ANTONIADOU K.I. and LIBERT A.-S.

Abstract (from CDS):


Aims. Many extrasolar systems possessing planets in mean-motion resonance or resonant chain have been discovered to date. The transit method coupled with transit timing variation analysis provides an insight into the physical and orbital parameters of the systems, but suffers from observational limitations. When a (near-)resonant planetary system resides in the dynamical neighbourhood of a stable periodic orbit, its long-term stability, and thus survival, can be guaranteed. We use the intrinsic property of the periodic orbits, namely their linear horizontal and vertical stability, to validate or further constrain the orbital elements of detected two-planet systems.
Methods. We computed the families of periodic orbits in the general three-body problem for several two-planet Kepler and K2 systems. The dynamical neighbourhood of the systems is unveiled with maps of dynamical stability.
Results. Additional validations or constraints on the orbital elements of K2-21, K2-24, Kepler-9, and (non-coplanar) Kepler-108 near-resonant systems were achieved. While a mean-motion resonance locking protects the long-term evolution of the systems K2-21 and K2-24, such a resonant evolution is not possible for the Kepler-9 system, whose stability is maintained through an apsidal anti-alignment. For the Kepler-108 system, we find that the stability of its mutually inclined planets could be justified either solely by a mean-motion resonance, or in tandem with an inclination-type resonance. Going forward, dynamical analyses based on periodic orbits could yield better constrained orbital elements of near-resonant extrasolar systems when performed in parallel to the fitting of the observational data.

Abstract Copyright: © ESO 2020

Journal keyword(s): celestial mechanics - planets and satellites: dynamical evolution and stability - planetary systems - methods: analytical - methods: numerical - chaos

Simbad objects: 18

goto Full paper

goto View the reference in ADS

Number of rows : 18

N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2020
#notes
1 * 54 Psc PM* 00 39 21.8055114029 +21 15 01.716052732 7.29 6.71 5.88 5.21 4.82 K0.5V 531 1
2 HD 7449 PM* 01 14 29.3222250437 -05 02 50.614804562   8.08 7.48     F9.5V 79 2
3 HD 45364 PM* 06 25 38.4744251424 -31 28 51.428476346   8.82 8.06     G8V 101 1
4 HD 60532 PM* 07 34 03.1802404179 -22 17 45.838378187 5.02 4.94 4.39     F6IV-V 200 1
5 HD 73526 PM* 08 37 16.4834968915 -41 19 08.787335986   9.69 9.00     G6V 170 2
6 HD 82943 PM* 09 34 50.7352288445 -12 07 46.363303103   7.17 6.53     F9VFe+0.5 408 2
7 HD 89744 PM* 10 22 10.5623067078 +41 13 46.308754730       5.4   F7V 301 1
8 HD 102272 * 11 46 23.5354467416 +14 07 26.353806918   9.71 8.71     K2 45 1
9 HD 108874 PM* 12 30 26.8817523074 +22 52 47.380606770   9.49   8.3   G9V 139 1
10 HD 128311 BY* 14 36 00.5607343227 +09 44 47.453643485 9.232 8.441 7.446 6.895 6.425 K3V 270 1
11 CD-24 12581 PM* 16 10 17.6977179986 -24 59 25.258944730   12.22 11.28     ~ 18 0
12 K2-32 * 16 49 42.2601117834 -19 32 34.150055300   13.28 12.31 12.11   ~ 28 0
13 Kepler-9 Ro* 19 02 17.7544105084 +38 24 03.177247136     13.9 14.09   G2 160 1
14 Kepler-82 Ro* 19 31 29.6084240054 +42 57 58.067351894           ~ 48 1
15 Kepler-108 ** 19 38 14.2465376625 +46 03 44.121940632           ~ 65 0
16 K2-21 LM* 22 41 12.8861743822 -14 29 20.349095360   14.14 12.85     M0V 15 0
17 TRAPPIST-1 LM* 23 06 29.3684052886 -05 02 29.031690445     18.798 16.466 14.024 M7.5e 534 0
18 K2-138 * 23 15 47.7685349429 -10 50 58.897706806   13.01 12.21 12.12 11.40 ~ 9 0

    Equat.    Gal    SGal    Ecl

To bookmark this query, right click on this link: simbad:objects in 2020A&A...640A..55A and select 'bookmark this link' or equivalent in the popup menu


2020.10.26-14:45:19

© Université de Strasbourg/CNRS

    • Contact