2021A&A...656A.113A


Query : 2021A&A...656A.113A

2021A&A...656A.113A - Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 656A, 113-113 (2021/12-1)

The solar carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances from a 3D LTE analysis of molecular lines.

AMARSI A.M., GREVESSE N., ASPLUND M. and COLLET R.

Abstract (from CDS):

Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are the fourth, sixth, and third most abundant elements in the Sun. Their abundances remain hotly debated due to the so-called solar modelling problem that has persisted for almost 20 years. We revisit this issue by presenting a homogeneous analysis of 408 molecular lines across 12 diagnostic groups, observed in the solar intensity spectrum. Using a realistic 3D radiative-hydrodynamic model solar photosphere and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) line formation, we find log εC = 8.47 ± 0.02, log εN = 7.89 ± 0.04, and log εO = 8.70 ± 0.04. The stipulated uncertainties mainly reflect the sensitivity of the results to the model atmosphere; this sensitivity is correlated between the different diagnostic groups, which all agree with the mean result to within 0.03 dex. For carbon and oxygen, the molecular results are in excellent agreement with our 3D non-LTE analyses of atomic lines. For nitrogen, however, the molecular indicators give a 0.12 dex larger abundance than the atomic indicators, and our best estimate of the solar nitrogen abundance is given by the mean: 7.83 dex. The solar oxygen abundance advocated here is close to our earlier determination of 8.69 dex, and so the present results do not significantly alleviate the solar modelling problem.

Abstract Copyright: © ESO 2021

Journal keyword(s): radiative transfer - line: formation - Sun: abundances - Sun: photosphere - Sun: atmosphere

VizieR on-line data: <Available at CDS (J/A+A/656/A113): table2.dat>

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2023.01.31-02:25:59

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