2000ApJ...544..218A


Query : 2000ApJ...544..218A

2000ApJ...544..218A - Astrophys. J., 544, 218-241 (2000/November-3)

Multiwavelength observations of dusty star formation at low and high redshift.

ADELBERGER K.L. and STEIDEL C.C.

Abstract (from CDS):

If high-redshift galaxies resemble rapidly star-forming galaxies in the local universe, most of the luminosity produced by their massive stars will have been absorbed by dust and reradiated as far-infrared photons that cannot be detected with existing facilities. This paper examines what can be learned about high-redshift star formation from the small fraction of high-redshift galaxies' luminosities that is emitted at accessible wavelengths. We first consider the most basic ingredient in the analysis of high-redshift surveys: the estimation of star formation rates for detected galaxies. Standard techniques require an estimate of the bolometric luminosity produced by their massive stars. We review and quantify empirical correlations between bolometric luminosities produced by star formation and the UV, mid-IR, sub-mm, and radio luminosities of galaxies in the local universe. These correlations suggest that observations of high-redshift galaxies at any of these wavelengths should constrain their star formation rates to within ∼0.2-0.3 dex. We assemble the limited evidence that high-redshift galaxies obey these locally calibrated correlations. The second part of the paper assesses whether existing surveys have found the galaxies that host the majority of star formation at high redshift even though they directly detect only a small fraction of the luminosities of individual galaxies. We describe the characteristic luminosities and dust obscurations of galaxies at z∼0, z∼1, and z∼3. After discussing the relationship between the high-redshift populations selected in surveys at different wavelengths, we calculate the contribution to the 850 µm background from each and argue that these known galaxy populations can together have produced the entire observed background. The available data show that a correlation between star formation rate and dust obscuration Lbol,dust/LUV exists at low and high redshift alike. The existence of this correlation plays a central role in the major conclusion of this paper: most star formation at high redshift occurred in galaxies with moderate dust obscurations 1≲Lbol,dust/LUV≲100 similar to those that host the majority of star formation in the local universe and to those that are detected in UV-selected surveys.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): ISM: Dust, Extinction - Galaxies: Evolution - Galaxies: Formation - Galaxies: ISM - Galaxies: Starburst

CDS comments: p. 220 Zw 049 not identified, p. 229 : IRAS F22691-1808 misprint for F22491-1808

Simbad objects: 67

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Number of rows : 67
N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2021
#notes
1 NAME SMM J00266+1708 GiC 00 26 34.10 +17 08 33.7     23.30   21.979 ~ 30 0
2 NGC 247 LSB 00 47 08.554 -20 45 37.44 10.11 9.61 9.10 8.87   ~ 387 2
3 IC 1586 bCG 00 47 56.301 +22 22 22.51   15.0       ~ 69 0
4 NGC 1232 EmG 03 09 45.514 -20 34 45.48   10.67 9.87 9.53 10.2 ~ 270 0
5 NGC 1313 G 03 18 16.046 -66 29 53.74   10.06 10.0 9.40 10.4 ~ 623 2
6 NGC 1398 GiG 03 38 52.130 -26 20 16.22   10.37   8.90 10.1 ~ 212 0
7 NGC 1614 AGN 04 34 00.027 -08 34 44.57   14.66 13.99     ~ 620 0
8 ZW VII 31 G 05 16 46.384 +79 40 12.63   15.8       ~ 139 0
9 2MASX J05210136-2521450 Sy2 05 21 01.3987198411 -25 21 45.269338983   15.47 14.75     ~ 444 0
10 NGC 2403 AGN 07 36 51.396 +65 36 09.17 9.31 8.84 8.38 8.19   ~ 1652 1
11 NGC 2683 AGN 08 52 41.345 +33 25 18.48 11.57 10.68 9.79 9.38   ~ 398 1
12 NAME IRAS F08572+3915 NW LIN 09 00 25.364 +39 03 54.23     16.66     ~ 372 1
13 UGC 5101 Sy1 09 35 51.599 +61 21 11.33   15.20 15.50     ~ 522 4
14 NGC 2976 GiP 09 47 15.458 +67 54 58.97 11.77 11.03 10.16 9.51   ~ 604 1
15 M 82 IG 09 55 52.430 +69 40 46.93 9.61 9.30 8.41     ~ 5470 6
16 NGC 3110 H2G 10 04 02.124 -06 28 29.12   13.4   13.3 12.5 ~ 148 3
17 M 108 SBG 11 11 30.967 +55 40 26.84   10.70       ~ 428 1
18 M 65 GiP 11 18 55.957 +13 05 31.96   9.6       ~ 417 1
19 NGC 3726 GiG 11 33 21.1357515876 +47 01 45.260627622   11.11   10.02   ~ 331 0
20 NGC 3877 GiG 11 46 07.782 +47 29 40.20   11.8       ~ 288 0
21 NGC 4038 GiP 12 01 53.002 -18 52 03.32   10.91   9.74 11.0 ~ 1289 1
22 NAME Antennae IG 12 01 53.170 -18 52 37.92           ~ 1589 0
23 NGC 4039 GiP 12 01 53.8 -18 53 06   11.08   9.77   ~ 1138 1
24 NGC 4178 H2G 12 12 46.443 +10 51 57.59   12.9       ~ 328 0
25 LEDA 39024 LIN 12 13 46.107 +02 48 41.50           ~ 317 1
26 NGC 4194 AGN 12 14 09.615 +54 31 35.93   13.79 13.30     ~ 424 2
27 NGC 4216 GiP 12 15 54.444 +13 08 57.84 11.51 10.99 10.01     ~ 381 1
28 M 99 H2G 12 18 49.625 +14 24 59.36 10.45 10.44 9.87     ~ 804 2
29 M 61 Sy2 12 21 54.9275149050 +04 28 25.588335799 10.07 10.18 9.65     ~ 905 2
30 NGC 4307 GiG 12 22 05.625 +09 02 36.79   13.4       ~ 148 0
31 M 100 AGN 12 22 54.9318850854 +15 49 20.294302163 10.04 10.05 9.35     ~ 1702 2
32 NGC 4355 Sy2 12 26 54.628 -00 52 39.51   14.21 13.37     ~ 431 2
33 NGC 4522 GiG 12 33 39.657 +09 10 29.54   13.6       ~ 339 0
34 NGC 4559 H2G 12 35 57.6399424116 +27 57 35.859639262   10.46 10.01     ~ 557 1
35 NGC 4565 LIN 12 36 20.804 +25 59 14.61   13.61 12.43     ~ 896 0
36 ISOHDF J123646.8+621048 IR 12 36 47.05 +62 10 45.4           ~ 5 0
37 NGC 4592 GiG 12 39 18.7574179346 -00 31 55.493486248   12.4   12.3 12.1 ~ 118 0
38 NGC 4595 GiG 12 39 51.9129989652 +15 17 51.960292929   12.8       ~ 188 0
39 NGC 4653 GiP 12 43 50.922 -00 33 40.68   12.6   12.6 12.3 ~ 111 1
40 NGC 4793 SBG 12 54 40.6134238572 +28 56 19.232232841   12.50 11.93     ~ 168 2
41 Mrk 231 Sy1 12 56 14.2340989340 +56 52 25.238555193   14.68 13.84     ~ 1843 3
42 M 63 LIN 13 15 49.2738527699 +42 01 45.726078017   9.34 8.59 8.35   ~ 1104 2
43 IC 883 SBG 13 20 35.380 +34 08 21.84   14.8       ~ 378 1
44 NGC 5135 Sy2 13 25 44.059 -29 50 01.24   12.58 13.35 11.53 12.2 ~ 439 1
45 NGC 5248 GiG 13 37 32.069 +08 53 06.22   11.4       ~ 467 0
46 NGC 5256 PaG 13 38 17.8 +48 16 41   14.1 13.42     ~ 406 2
47 Mrk 273 Sy2 13 44 42.164 +55 53 13.53   15.68 14.91     ~ 843 3
48 [BCS99b] ACO 1835 J2 GiC 14 01 04.806 +02 52 24.73           ~ 18 0
49 NAME SMM J14011+0252 GiC 14 01 04.95 +02 52 24.0           ~ 152 1
50 M 101 GiP 14 03 12.583 +54 20 55.50   8.46 7.86 7.76   ~ 2631 2
51 NAME SMM J141809.8+522205 G 14 18 09.73 +52 22 01.3           ~ 27 0
52 NGC 5653 H2G 14 30 10.411 +31 12 55.86   12.7       ~ 160 0
53 2MASX J14373831-1500239 Sy1 14 37 38.317 -15 00 23.97   16.58 16.40     ~ 250 1
54 NGC 5806 AGN 15 00 00.432 +01 53 28.56   12.40 11.70 10.94 11.6 ~ 250 1
55 NGC 5860 EmG 15 06 33.73 +42 38 29.2   14.2       ~ 83 0
56 NGC 5879 AGN 15 09 46.7282797389 +57 00 00.544806616   11.9       ~ 231 1
57 NGC 5906 GiG 15 15 53.687 +56 19 43.86   11.4       ~ 704 1
58 2MASX J15265942+3558372 LIN 15 26 59.442 +35 58 37.01   15.61       ~ 249 1
59 NGC 5936 H2G 15 30 00.846 +12 59 21.55   13.0       ~ 152 1
60 IC 4553 SyG 15 34 57.22396 +23 30 11.6084   14.76 13.88     ~ 2758 4
61 NGC 6090 PaG 16 11 40.3 +52 27 21   14.0       ~ 404 2
62 SDSS J164501.07+462615.4 QSO 16 45 01.0722128835 +46 26 15.471165011           ~ 138 0
63 NGC 6240 Sy2 16 52 58.861 +02 24 03.55   14.31 13.37     ~ 1525 2
64 ESO 338-4 IG 19 27 58.338 -41 34 30.81   13.55 13.21 13.14 13.43 ~ 212 1
65 NGC 6946 H2G 20 34 52.332 +60 09 13.24   10.5       ~ 2319 2
66 NAME South America H2G 22 51 49.307 -17 52 23.96   16.97       ~ 295 3
67 NGC 7673 EmG 23 27 41.060 +23 35 20.18 12.84 13.17 12.76     ~ 265 1

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2021.07.31-11:13:11

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