SIMBAD references

2002ApJ...570L..79K - Astrophys. J., 570, L79-L83 (2002/May-2)

X-ray timing of the enigmatic neutron star RX J0720.4-3125.

KAPLAN D.L., KULKARNI S.R., VAN KERKWIJK M.H. and MARSHALL H.L.

Abstract (from CDS):

RX J0720.4-3125 is the third brightest neutron star in the soft X-ray sky and has been a source of mystery since its discovery, as its long 8 s period separates it from the population of typical radio pulsars. Three models were proposed for this source: a neutron star accreting from the interstellar medium, an off-beam radio pulsar, or an old, cooling magnetar. Using data from Chandra, ROSAT, and BeppoSAX, we are able to place an upper limit to the period derivative, |P{dot}|<3.6x10–13 s.s–1 (3 σ). While our upper limit on P{dot} allows for the accretion model, this model is increasingly untenable for another similar but better studied neutron star, RX J1856.5-3754, and we therefore consider the accretion model unlikely for RX J0720.4-3125. We constrain the initial magnetic field of RX J0720.4-3125 to be ≲1014 G based on cooling models, suggesting that it is not and never was a magnetar but is instead a middle-aged neutron star. We propose that it is either a long-period high magnetic field pulsar with P{dot}∼10–13 s.s–1, similar to PSR J1814-1744, or a neutron star born with an initial period of ~8.3 s and P{dot}∼10–15 s.s–1. The proximity of RX J0720.4-3125 is strongly suggestive of a large population of such objects; if so, radio pulsar surveys must have missed many of these sources.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): Stars: Pulsars: Individual: Alphanumeric: RX J0720.4-3125 - Stars: Neutron - X-Rays: Stars

CDS comments: Fig. 4 : PSR J2144-3944 misprint for ...-3933, parag.5 RX J1308.8+2127 misprint for J1308.6+2127, PSR J1830-1135 not identified

Simbad objects: 11

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