SIMBAD references

2009MNRAS.395..504B - Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 395, 504-517 (2009/May-1)

Wide-field imaging and polarimetry for the biggest and brightest in the 20-GHz southern sky.

BURKE-SPOLAOR S., EKERS R.D., MASSARDI M., MURPHY T., PARTRIDGE B., RICCI R. and SADLER E.M.

Abstract (from CDS):

We present the wide-field imaging and polarimetry at ν = 20GHz of seven most extended, bright (Stotal≥ 0.50Jy), high-frequency selected radio sources in the southern sky with declinations δ < -30°. Accompanying the data are brief reviews of the literature for each source. The results presented here aid in the statistical completeness of the Australia Telescope 20-GHz Survey: the Bright Source Sample. The data are of crucial interest for future cosmic microwave background missions as a collection of information about candidate calibrator sources. We were able to obtain data for seven of the nine sources identified by our selection criteria. We report that PictorA is thus far the best extragalactic calibrator candidate for the Low Frequency Instrument of the Planck European Space Agency mission due to its high level of integrated polarized flux density (∼0.50 ±0.06Jy) on a scale of 10arcmin. Six out of the seven sources have a clearly detected compact radio core in our images, with either a null detection or less than 2 per cent detection of polarized emission from the nuclei. Most sources with detected jets have magnetic field alignments running in a longitudinal configuration, however, PKS1333-33 exhibits transverse fields and an orthogonal change in field geometry from nucleus to jets.

Abstract Copyright: © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 RAS

Journal keyword(s): polarization - galaxies: active - galaxies: magnetic fields - cosmic microwave background - radio continuum: galaxies

Simbad objects: 19

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2021.07.26-05:53:23

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