SIMBAD references

2021ApJS..253...40C - Astrophys. J., Suppl. Ser., 253, 40-40 (2021/April-0)

The synchrotron-based far-infrared spectrum of glycolaldehyde.

COLLIER B., KRUEGER K., MILLER I., ZHAO J., BILLINGHURST B.E. and RASTON P.L.

Abstract (from CDS):

Glycolaldehyde (GA) has been observed toward several different sources, with a broad range of rotational temperatures (8-300 K). At the high end, the temperature is comparable to the energy of the lowest vibrational states of GA, making the vibrational contribution to the partition function significant. Here, we report an analysis of the high-resolution far-infrared spectrum of GA, which features a plethora of well-resolved lines from 170-430 cm–1 (13-5 THz). We focus on the three fundamental vibrational bands in this range, i.e., the symmetric ν12 bend at 282 cm–1, and the asymmetric ν17 and ν18 torsions at 360 and 208 cm–1, respectively. We assigned 23,266 transitions to 13,999 lines within these bands, which, when combined with the previously reported microwave and millimeter-wave spectra, allowed for refinement of the vibrationally excited rotational constants, and accurate determination of their band origins. Additionally, the assignment of a number of lines in several hot bands that are significantly populated at 300 K allowed for determination of their band origins. The rotational constants reported here should be useful in searches of vibrationally excited GA toward warm sources, and the accurately determined band origins allow for refinement of the vibrational partition function, and therefore column density, for a given excitation temperature.

Abstract Copyright: © 2021. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

Journal keyword(s): Interstellar medium - Molecular spectroscopy - Molecular physics

Simbad objects: 4

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2021.08.01-00:31:56

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